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of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate. iran had been helpful, rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least been not actively and helpful but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be coopted and that would have collaborated new arrangements and instead we send them to guantanamo and send very negative signals to those who might consider coopting and being coopted into the new system and it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems and despite the fact that now more than ten years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign. we have come a long way than many of us realize and i think some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia society put out a couple weeks ago which showed in disti
responsibility in the aftermath of the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we had successfully built for the war and for the peace conference to disintegrate. iran had been very helpful. week rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least then not actively and helpful. but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were a certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be cooperative, that would have collaborated. instead, we sent them to guantanamo, and sent a negative signal to those who might consider who being coopted into the new system. it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems, and despite the fact that now, more than 10 years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign in afghanistan, i think we have come a longer way than many of us realize. some of this is reflected in a recent poll the asia s
in 2009. taliban will be given a seat at table and allowed to open an office in qatar. the taliban must first renounce terrorism. >> bret: we talked about what the troop number will be at the end of 2014. what is the going thinking on that. what about the concern about protecting those troops if the number is very low? >> well, absolutely. what we have confirmed is general john allen, the top commanderrer in afghanistan given the national security team around the president three options. 9,000 option, 6,000 option. and 3,000 option. the president will likely decide on 3,000 to 6,000 troops and that will not give you much option in terms of the training and assisting the afghanistan security forces. they will set up bases to deal with al-qaeda if fringe area along the border. >> bret: we'll follow it. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. thank you. do you think the president should speed up the process of having afghan take control of the security? let me know on twitter. to me at bret baier. the politics, west virginia senator rockefeller will not seek a sixth term. the leader of the congr
to shape where the taliban goes because, of course, its internal issue is that the afghan taliban began to actually seed and grow in insurgency inside pakistan that they had to deal with, and i think that's fundamental. the troops on the ground don't necessarily help us solve that problem. other issues, money and other elements of state, will help us influence pakistan. >> what do we know about conversations between the karzai regime and the taliban, the negotiations in france? >> well, president karzai during our interview said that they are currently still in negotiations and talking to the taliban, but there hasn't been any proof that they actually have been because the taliban themselves they send emails and talk to us on the phone as journalists and they tell us that in no way will they talk to what they call the puppet regime of america, referring to president karzai in his government, but the afghan officials that we speak to, they say that they are currently talking to the taliban, but they may be. we just don't know what level of the taliban that they're talking to. >> i know t
army. despite the billions spent and the thousands of lives lost, the taliban has not been defeated. some say at the america pulls out too quickly, it will be trade promises made and leave afghanistan vulnerable. >> it will be difficult to engage down the road if there is a large al qaeda return or the taliban takes over the country, to get the afghanistan's to trust us when we say we will be there to help you. >> america described it as the final chapter in afghanistan. president obama downsized out of the ambitions, winding down the war that is increasingly unpopular at home. this is not the final chapter. that is just that americans have grown wary about spending the money and spilling the blood. >>> for more on the future of the u.s. mission, i spoke a short time ago with the former u.s. ambassador to afghanistan. ambassador, thank you very much for coming in. president obama says that things are going so well he can actually speed up the transition. are the afghan security forces really ready to take over in the spring or is this more a matter of expediency for both countries?
their camps. taliban infiltration is often to blame. the tactic is to undermine the relationship between afghan forces and the coalition partners, making it more difficult for the afghan military to take over security here. president karzai arrived in washington today. mapping out afghanistan's future after foreign combat troops have left. their meeting will determine the primary mission, to fight the taliban or to get rid of al qaeda. president karzai wants soldiers. his forces lead emissions across the country. they are still not ready. for many years to come, these soldiers in afghanistan generally will rely on america's support. >> for more on those meetings taking place, i spoke with peter bergen. what is the main sticking point in these meetings between what the white house wants and what president karzai wants? >> it is the question of immunity for american forces. the u.s. does not want its soldiers being prosecuted by an afghan accords for obvious reasons. this is a big sticking point. >> karzai would like that? >> yes. that is very much what he would like. and then there is the
after nearly being killed by the taliban. tonight she's walking and inspiring people around the world. >>> and what's wrong with this picture? what happened after the women of the hill posed for a photo and why it's getting so much attention tonight. "nightly news" begins now. >>> from nbc news world headquarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with brian williams. >> good evening, i'm lester holt in tonight for brian, who will be back monday. a lot of americans are spending this first week of the new year flat on their backs, taken down by the flu in numbers we typically wouldn't see until much later in the winter. and according to the centers for disease control, those numbers are rapidly climbing with a peak nowhere in sight. the government reports as of a week ago, flu cases were widespread in 41 states. that's 10 more states and a week earlier. what's more, this flu strain appears to be a particularly nasty one. it's even proven deadly in a handful of cases involving the young. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell starts us off tonight with more. >> have you ha
will not bode well for the peace talks with the taliban. it comes at a time when the u.s. and pakistan are making efforts to engage with them. pakistan said the program was counterproductive and of violation of its sovereignty. -- a violation of its sovereignty. >> they have eliminated a crucial link, whether it has any major impact on the reconciliation process, it is difficult to say at the moment. there is someone else who could walk into the footsteps. >> u.s. troops are said to leave in 2014. this death could further jeopardize the prospects of these future -- of a future deal. the killing also coincides with a conditional offer by the pakistanis about a possible cease-fire. military leaders are due to meet on friday. the killing is expected to have an impact on pakistan's 2014 strategy. al jazeera, is all about. >> as western troops prepare to pullout, a growing number of citizens are considering leaving. they fear the possible return of the taliban and more instability. when the taliban were toppled in 2001, 52,000 applied for asylum overseas. that number dropped away from 25,00
as taliban momentum, and to give ourselves a bridge force to give us time to build up afghan security forces did i reluctantly come to the conclusion we're going to need more western forces, probably mostly american. we came up with detailed analysis on what we had to secure to be effective, and the requirement was for 40,000 forces. and so we recommended that which followed not long after our strategic assessment. >> rose: after the number of troops had already come in because of mckernen. >> yes. some of those forces hadn't yet arrived. >> rose: then you went to london. >> yes. >> rose: and you make a speech. the speech is okay. then there's a q&a session. >> yes. >> rose: and you say what. >> rose: i went to london at the request of the british government to engage parts of both their media and their government to explain the strategy. at that time we were executing a strategy that i had derived a mission strategy i derived from president obama's public statements his speeches in the spring when he authorized more forces and my understanding of what it is my mission was which had beg
now but i would say when i arrived in 2002 in afghanistan, pretty early after the fall of the taliban, the country was devastated physically and traumatized sipsychologically. it was literally a basket case. didn't know which way was up. normal was everything before 1978. people couldn't remember normal. they've made a loving progret o. there are girls in school. it's imperfect but now they're scared because there's a lot to lose now. they had this kchaotic 34 year and they don't want to lose it. it isn't numbers of people but it's a relationship that gives them the confidence that we'll are enough of a partner that if they need our help -- not thousands of troops and no billions of dollars -- >> but some sort of relationship. >> some relationship. >> how do you have that when you have afghan forces killing nato forces and personnel? >> there's a lot of mistrust. >> now we stop going on patrols with these guys. >> for a period they did but in reality, again, if you use the anecdote to prove the whole, sometimes it's not true. the wider story is more complex. you've been there. there's
in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines came into in 2009 and subsequently it has stabilized significantly since then. so the primary mission of marines in southwest afghanistan is security. but our secondary mission is to assist our interagency partners in kick starting institutions that contribute to a stable nation state. as an educator i joined the team to oversee the portfolio of education and was given the opportunity to implement the country's education strategic plan over the southwest provinces. additionally i was given the national action plan for women and control of two female engagement teams which were marines trained to interact with the population of women because of the pashi culture, the males were not allowed to interact with the women. in order obviously to ensure communities stay strong you have to not only address the men, but you absolutely need to address the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the
arrived in 2002 in afghanistan, pretty early after the fall of the taliban, the country was devastated physically. and traumatized psychologically, it was literally a basket case, didn't know what was up. and normal was before 1978, that was 24 years at the time. people couldn't remember normal. they made a lot of progress. there are girls in school. there is progress, greater places. there is progress, it is imperfect. now they're scared. they're scared of 2014 because there is a all riglot to lose n they had chaos for 34 years, and the afghan people don't want to lose it. i think what the afghan people want from the u.s. and the west is strategic partnership, not numbers but a relationship that gives them a confidence that we are enough of a partner that if they need our help, not thousands of troops, maybe not even billions of dollars. >> but some sort of presence. >> some sort of presence and some sort of relationship. >> but how do you have that relationship when you have afghan soldiers and police killing u.s. nato forces and utilize personnel, there is a huge amount of distrust,
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
name malvi, a taliban commander. as far as i could tell, it was a perfectly legal and good thing to do, but the blowback on the ground is something that -- can be furious and last friday i was at the pentagon talking to the joint chiefs legal advisor who we talked about this at length. one of the things that they try to do as they analyze and propose strike, what's the blowback going to be. >> on the ground. >> on the ground. you can hit a guy in the house, but if all the neighbors -- if that causes them to go join the taliban, you know, you have taken a big step backwards. he was trying to persuade me that they pay attention to that when they're looking at a proposed strike, but the problem is how can do you that from washington? very, very difficult. the evidence so far is in yemen, for example, enormous blowback. you know, the analysis that i've seen is that we've caused more harm than good there. >> ben, i wonder, the other -- there is blowback regionally, but there has been such a lack of discussion here, and i remember the "new york times" kill list story that raised hackles in t
, you face different levels of [inaudible] the province is quiet. the taliban are not operating. there's less threat against you and your family. therefore despite the inferences being made, we still have challenges to recruit a member -- members of the security forces from those provinces. we purposely go and try to recruit students from the south or places [indiscernible] since the school system was not to this standard, i does not matter. we're not successful to bring them as much as we want. >> do you want to talk about these issues? >> in terms of who revises the afghan national army, in 2001, we had a plethora of offers. the pakistani, the indian, and the iranian fradkin to me and said it wanted to collaborate. i thought that we ought to try to devise some arrangement in which i and some limited aspects, countries could participate. others in the administration were opposed to any iranian role. relations between pakistan and india were at a nadir. coins and with 9/11 and the subsequent bond process, a pakistani base -- terrorist group had conducted a large- scale terrorist attack
said the taliban and al qaeda are two different elements. if we stay after killing bin laden, we have lost our purpose. he said the worst thing we can do is get bogged down without getting out. it wasn't that long ago, but it was interesting to look back a year and eight months ago to when bin laden was killed. i mean, at the time, anybody else think that maybe that would have meant we would come home from afghanistan? it seemed like one of the real possibilities that opened up with that almost unbelievable news on that cold night in may. but we did not leave afghanistan after this happened. this was roughly 600 days ago. we've got another 700 days ahead of us before the white house says this war will officially end, nearly two years from now. but how many american troops are left there between now and then? and what are those troops expected to do? how much fighting are they going to be doing? how much of our 11 and a half yearlong war is going to continue to result in americans getting hurt and killed between now and then? all of that remains to be decided. what is going to happen i
the taliban out of their holds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure than insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges. but because this progress, our transition is on track. at the n.a.t.o. summit last year, we agreed with our coalition partners that after beg afghan forces in 2013. the president has been here and we've consulted with coalition partners and continue to do so. today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalitions forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight alongside afghan forces as needed, but starting this spring our troops will have a different mission, training, advising, assi
in the head by taliban gunmen, malala yousafzai walked out of a london hospital, a big step forward on the road to recovery. and just ahead, we'll tell you what's next in her treatment and also how authorities plan to protect her from the taliban moving forward. she was shot in the head, the bullet grazed her brain. she's become an international symbol of courage. her crusade for girls' education is what made her a target of the taliban. but she's never backed down from their threats. in the next month, they're going to replace a section of her scattered skull. amazing how far she's come, and matthew chance joins me now. i think you would agree, it's pretty remarkable to look at those images. do we know what malala and her family are planning to do now? are they planning to stay in britain, at least for the foreseeable future? >> it is amazing. nobody thought she would be able to get up so quickly from the terrible injuries she sustained. it's interesting, that question, because over the past couple of days, the pakistan government has announced it's given a job to malala yousafzai'
the fall of the taliban the country was devastated physically and traumatized psychologically. it was a basket case. and normal was everything before 1978. that was 23 years at the time and now it is 34. people couldn't remember normal. they have made a lot of progress. there are girls in school. it is imperfect and now they are scared of 2014 because there is a lot to lose now and they had this chaotic 34 years and the afghan people don't want to lose it. i think instead of just troop numbers what the afghan people want is a partnership which is a relationship that gives them the confidence that we are enough of a partner that if they need our help, not thousands of troops not even billions of dollars but some sort of presence and relationship. >> how do you have that relationship when you have afghan soldiers and police killing nato forces and u.s. personal? i mean there is a huge amount of distress probably more than there has ever been. >> we have to work through that. >> our whole program is building up afghan security forces and yet now we stop going on patrol with these
-- liberating afghanistan from an invasion and a rule by the taliban. the first one, in reverse order, the first one freeing afghanistan happened within a month and a half to two months. subbing squect of that afghanistan began its journey towards democracy, the rule of law, progress in all aspects of life. it went all right. it went reasonablely good under the circumstances. without a doubt with the help of the united states and our other allies around the world. the second part, freeing us all from terrorism and radicalism, didn't work as swiftly as we expected. there was bumps along the road and setbacks. now, the afghan people regardless where they stand recognize that afghanistan could not have made the progress that we have made in the past 10 years without the help we received from our allies. led by the united states of america. in more cruder terms the u.s. taxpayer's money. it contributed to afghanistan's upliftment. it contributed to the workplace, to society, to policy, the return of young girls to education. the return of universities, roads, communications, mobile phones, computers
about is that from our perspective, it is not possible to reconcile without the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes that they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and you can't resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that about every country in the world. and so, you know, we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution, its protection of minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection, not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghan -- afghanistan's long-term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treat its women. does it educate that half
will the taliban plal in the future of that country. and what role will the united states play after we end our combat mission? how many troops will we keep behind in afghanistan to keep that country secure if we can? jim moran is a democrat congressman from virginia and westmore is a retired army captain and author of "the other wes moore. i guess the question comes down to numbers. 66,000 troops in country right now. what should be it be five years from now. >> i think we're going to initially withdraw to 6,000 troops in 2014. i think a lot of work will be done by contractors, not u.s. troops, but we can't afford to continue spending the kind of money we're spending. you know, we have spent $557 billion up to today, half a trillion dollars, and what have we gotten for it? burma, somalia, and afghanistan are the three most corrupt nations in the world, and now almost 90% of that corruption is coming from american taxpayers' money. you'd be shocked at the amount of american taxpayers' money that's being spent over in dubai because it came in to afghanistan. this is a nation that's -- a governme
this application after he escaped from the taliban. this is how he lived in greece -- schering cramped quarters with three others with no windows -- sharing cramped quarters with three others with no windows. now all he wants to do is go back home. >> the people back home are expecting me to return a rich man. i borrowed money to escape, and i cannot pay it back. back then, i fled from the taliban. now, i will have to explain that. i am frightened for my life. >> the afghan refugee has a life here, but not much of one. he has had to rely on his friends, but they do not have much, either. instant coffee is the main staple, and they only get to eat on a good day. their only source of income was from working off the books until the economic crisis hit. now they have been replaced by greeks. there is nothing left for the refugees. hundreds come to the international organization for migration every day. it is running the government program for those returning home. we met up again with farouk and his co-travelers. in the past year, over 6000 people have left the country under the scheme. it has cost
lives there. she was attacked by the taliban if you will remember for challenging the terrorist group's efforts to deny other rights for women. the taliban still says they will try to target her again. >>> and still ahead, mixed news on those new unemployment numbers. a little later on as we check in with the redskins. see how they are getting ready for sunday's big game against the seahawks of seattle. >>> and coming up next, a little boy gets the thrill of the young life when his favorite super hero turns out to be his all-time favorite hero. >>> if you don't have it yet, you want to be sure to download the brand new iphone app. it's got news on your fingertips and live interactive weather maps, just like the one that topper is using all for free. it is also available for the kindle fire and some other android tablets. >>> all right employment rate is still at 7.8% tonight. even though they added 155,000 jobs last month. it just wasn't enough to drop the jobless rates. the biggest gain is health care, food service, manufacturing, construction. still more than 12 million americans ar
're living right now in the united kingdom because the taliban says it would shoot her again. malala became a target after she campaigned for women in afghanistan. my friend and colleague has been covering the story since the beginning. good of you to come in on this saturday. first of all, remarkable recovery. how is she doing? >> she's doing well by all accounts. sources close to her say she's recovering well. this girl was shot in the head at point-blank range and she's only 15 years old. so by all accounts, being able to walk out of the hospital in her own two feet is a major milestone when it comes to her recovery. she's got a physical recovery to make after a long surgery and hopefully at the end of this month and then, of course, there's a psychological recovery and there's a lot of trauma when it comes to being shot by the taliban and this girl has a long road ahead of her. >> she's committed to her fight for education in pakistan. will they come back? >> it doesn't look like it right now. certainly they've been saying and pakistani officials have been saying, but they want to go ba
've found a cause. that's coming up. >>> shot by the taliban for standing up for women's rights. today a teenager from pakistan takes a major step in her recovery. >>> and the house taking action to help victim of superstorm sandy, but not everybody approved the aid. we'll break this all down with the vote. >>> and giving you a live look at the dry conditions that christina speaks of. the bay bridge toll plaza. where in the world is everybody? they're at home enjoying this friday morning. [ female announcer ] pillsbury crescents on their own are fantastic but add some sauce, pepperoni and cheese and fold up the crescent dough...and presto! tuesday night just became crescent pizza pocket-tastic pillsbury crescents. let the making begin here's a better idea. pillsbury grands! flaky layers biscuits in just 15 minutes the light delicate layers add a layer of warmth to your next dinner. pillsbury grands biscuits let the making begin. >>> well, in case you just are joining us, we wanted to bring you the latest on breaking news that we're following out of tahoe. douglas county sheriff's depar
troops. and more concerning is to have the allies negotiate with the taliban? >> i am disappointed. he said it is a responsible war then his actions i think indicate pretreat. leaving earlier and removing u.s. troops and the objective was not to solidify this seems they know when they can come back. >> not surprisingly i disagree. we're probably pulling out somewhat to quickly. but you have to negotiate with your enemy. i cannot believe that haida is inclusive of the taliban. but if we can have them agree to terms with violence , a supportive democratization we cannot afford to say no negotiation ? >> i am not as optimistic. there is no way to negotiate. the idea of the taliban office and patter? -- katar? we are cutting out too early. that is what this president does. if we don't fight this war the way it needs to be fought, a stop shedding blood the president was never in this to win. lori: what about the war in afghanistan was it worth the time? >> for me to say that it is not worth the lives lost is to disparage them but unfortunately i wish it was fought by generals visited bureau
afghanistan to launch attacks against our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure and insurgents continue to lose territory. afghan forces continue to grow stronger, meanwhile. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges, but because this progress our transition is on track. last year we agreed with partners that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid 2013. president karzai and his team have been here for several days, we have consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight
, for the pakistani teenager shot in the head by taliban gunmen, malala walked out of a london hospital, a big step forward on the road to recovery. and just ahead, we'll tell you what's next in her treatment and also how authorities plan to protect her from the taliban moving forward. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real. geico's customer satisfaction is quite real though. this computer-animated coffee tastes dreadful. geico. 15 minutes could save you 15 % or more on car insurance. someone get me a latte will ya, please? trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. to divvy up this shared d
: there is another headline out of this too, jennifer, that's talks with the taliban. >> after 11 years of war, the afghan president announced today from the white house the taliban will be given a seat at the table. >> we agreed on allowing the taliban office in qatar. >> president obama issued a caveat. the taliban must renounce terrorism. the president diverted attention from those asking whether 11 years of war were worth it by announcing today army staff sergeant clinton romesha who helped repel one of the most vicious attacks in eastern afghanistan in 2009 would receive the medal of honor, shepard. >> shepard: first you kill the taliban and then you have him in for talks. fascinating. 2013. jen griffin at the pentagon. thanks. john boehner formally invited the president to deliver his first state of the union of his second term the date february 12th. he has to be invited, you know. the president hats accepted the date which also happens to be abraham lincoln's birthday it will touch on immigration reform spending and gun control. in a letter to the president speaker boehner wrote our na
valley, that's an area which had been controlled by the taliban just three years ago in the pakistani army came in, launched a sweeping operation to push them out but in recent months we've seen the taliban creeping back in a couple of weeks ago, a couple of months ago, rather we had an attack on the pakistani school girl malala yousafzai who was shot by the taliban and today we had this attack on a religious congregation hundreds had gathered to hear a leader speak in the main town and the death toll in that attack was 22 and was seen as another sign the taliban was not back in swat, certainly starting to reassert their authority there. >> pelley: there was a third attack in pakistan today, this one also in quetta. who was the target? >> earlier today there was a bomb attack on a pakistani paramilitary patrol in the center of quetta. that attack was carried out by a nationalist group that later claimed control -- rather that later claimed responsibility for attack. the ethnic nationalists have been fighting against the pakistani army, against the state for about seven or eight years
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 66 (some duplicates have been removed)